Tor Wacky Times and the NSA

gAtO rEaD – that Tor (The Deep Dark Web) is now all messed up by the NSA, FBI and LEO so all you bad guys using the Tor network better watch out, or should they???fed_links_01

Aug 5 the FBI snakes in Freedom Hosting and put a number of websites out of business in the Dark Web. They let the flames go out that they caught a bunch of Pedophile sites with that bust, but it does not seem so.

The Attack on the Dark Net Took Down a Lot More Than Child Porn – http://gawker.com/the-attack-on-the-dark-net-took-down-a-lot-more-than-ch-1081274609 – gAtO contribute to this article–

fed_usCitizenship_01Aug 19 – Millions of Tor Clients start to go up in numbers. What’s this all about, we get a bunch of Tor clients just hanging around doing nothing in Tor. Some say it’s a Bot-net or something like that. Then it growns 4, 5  million Tor users and the last week or so it starts to go down again. So what is all this about all these Tor Clients and the Tor- Botnet?fed_rent_a_hacker01

Oct 3– Silk Road get’s taken down, Oh the FBI had a copy of the Silk Road servers back in June just before the AUG 5 take down of FH by the FBI. So the Feds had Silk Road all this time and this is all they can do, can’t even get a few Bitcoin wallets- what a cluster fˆ%k—//fed_cc-paypal_01

Now you got NSA saying that Tor is cracked and the bad guys cannot use it. They claim that they can hack Tor anytime and anywhere with documents that a summer student left on how to hack the Tor network back in 2006. By the Way – most of these hacks do not work in Tor, maybe on a regular network but not on the Tor network.fed_hit_man_01

So now gAtO goes in search of Tor sites and a lot of sites went down by hook or crook —BUT someone has started to replace these Tor Hidden Websites in the Tor Network – But something is FuNnY – all these sites us the same web templates –

So now you can take a walk down memory lane and see all the older Tor-Websites have gone away and new ones have magicly re-appear.

fed_apple4bitcoin_01Now if this was the only place were this has happens OK sure, but at other Tor- Wiki Tor Link sites you will see the same thing – Commercial sites are all FuNnY and all the non-commercial Tor-websites are Tango Down.

So now Tor goes round and round but nobody knows what the heck is going on- In the Tor network – The Deep Dark Web run by Criminals or the FBI – you can answer these questions yourself by visiting the site –trust but Verify– ((not me))– gAtO oUt

fed_counterfiet_euro_50 fed_counterfiet_usd_01 fed_links_01 fed_mobile_steal_store_01 fed_uk_guns_01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tor Network Consensus Document

gAtO lOOkInG – at the Tor-network intelligence, how does it do what it does. Tor takes volunteers Onion-relays and organizes them into different categories they are called “flags” –

—  known-flags Authority BadExit Exit Fast Guard HSDir Named Running Stable Unnamed V2Dir Valid  —

Of course there are only now 10 authority flags-servers own and controlled by some of the top people in the Tor-project community. These 10 Authority-relays control all the intelligence that Tor need to run and keep everything working automatic. Every few hours these relays gather the OR-relays and depending on how long they have been turned on, how much bandwidth they have what version of Tor-software and OS they have and put this together into one document then it does a calculation and assigns flags to the 3,500 or so volunteer OR-relays throughout the world. After it’s all said and done they produce a “Consensus Document and sends this information to every HSDir -OR-relay so that clients can find hidden service websites in Tor. The HSDIR relays have all the DNS information to find Tor-hidden service -websites…//

consensus document – May-2013

———————————————————————————-———————————————————————————

network-status-version 3

vote-status consensus

consensus-method 17

valid-after 2013-05-17 12:00:00

fresh-until 2013-05-17 13:00:00

valid-until 2013-05-17 15:00:00

voting-delay 300 300

client-versions 0.2.2.39,0.2.3.24-rc,0.2.3.25,0.2.4.5-alpha,0.2.4.6-alpha,0.2.4.7-alpha,0.2.4.8-alpha,0.2.4.9-alpha,0.2.4.10-alpha,0.2.4.11-alpha,0.2.4.12-alpha

server-versions 0.2.2.39,0.2.3.24-rc,0.2.3.25,0.2.4.5-alpha,0.2.4.6-alpha,0.2.4.7-alpha,0.2.4.8-alpha,0.2.4.9-alpha,0.2.4.10-alpha,0.2.4.11-alpha,0.2.4.12-alpha

known-flags Authority BadExit Exit Fast Guard HSDir Named Running Stable Unnamed V2Dir Valid

params CircuitPriorityHalflifeMsec=30000 UseOptimisticData=1 bwauthpid=1 pb_disablepct=0

 

dir-source tor26 14C131DFC5C6F93646BE72FA1401C02A8DF2E8B4 86.59.21.38 86.59.21.38 80 443

contact Peter Palfrader

vote-digest C9B36D4CE1E4E25D313DBCB9CAB01BD6402136BB

dir-source turtles 27B6B5996C426270A5C95488AA5BCEB6BCC86956 76.73.17.194 76.73.17.194 9030 9090

contact Mike Perry <mikeperryTAfsckedTODorg>

vote-digest 2974C1E86CE7D44B2A1B304DDED4D6965C519F6C

dir-source maatuska 49015F787433103580E3B66A1707A00E60F2D15B 171.25.193.9 171.25.193.9 443 80

contact 4096R/23291265 Linus Nordberg <linus@nordberg.se>

vote-digest 4C9F8F31152829E776531350A3D0A3AB4F601FBF

dir-source dannenberg 585769C78764D58426B8B52B6651A5A71137189A dannenberg.ccc.de 193.23.244.244 80 443

contact Andreas Lehner <anonymizer@ccc.de>

vote-digest E326C020E9462BA105EC190DFBE4EA8FADA3A138

dir-source urras 80550987E1D626E3EBA5E5E75A458DE0626D088C 208.83.223.34 208.83.223.34 443 80

contact 4096R/4193A197 Jacob Appelbaum <jacob@appelbaum.net>

vote-digest 9D6CB9D0890C4BF18D12BBB4F26F5BC762B081C3

dir-source moria1 D586D18309DED4CD6D57C18FDB97EFA96D330566 128.31.0.34 128.31.0.34 9131 9101

contact 1024D/28988BF5 arma mit edu

vote-digest 21FCEA71FE6597E39E586721F7DA65C3A74A4EA1

dir-source dizum E8A9C45EDE6D711294FADF8E7951F4DE6CA56B58 194.109.206.212 194.109.206.212 80 443

contact 1024R/8D56913D Alex de Joode <adejoode@sabotage.org>

vote-digest 0787DE217B45ED8895701D679F02E755A257AF4F

dir-source gabelmoo ED03BB616EB2F60BEC80151114BB25CEF515B226 212.112.245.170 212.112.245.170 80 443

contact 4096R/C5AA446D Sebastian Hahn <tor@sebastianhahn.net>

vote-digest EEECD55223C97CACF7655D897782B61B64C1CF03

dir-source Faravahar EFCBE720AB3A82B99F9E953CD5BF50F7EEFC7B97 154.35.32.5 154.35.32.5 80 443

contact 0x0B47D56D SiNA Rabbani (inf0) <sina redteam io>

vote-digest EE92CA0F3820E3BAFC22C41DFD107D4F4B34E542

r ididnteditheconfig6 AB+dZViiymIEpTtbx+9cX5Y32i0 sjraCwjE8lzInizQ0UPqTI1AHkE 2013-05-17 10:29:13 128.8.24.14 9001 9030

s Exit Fast Running V2Dir Valid

v Tor 0.2.3.25

w Bandwidth=14

p accept 20-23,43,53,79-81,88,110,143,194,220,389,443,464,531,543-544,554,563,636,706,749,873,902-904,981,989-995,1194,1220,1293,1500,1533,1677,1723,1755,1863,2082-2083,2086-2087,2095-2096,2102-2104,3128,3389,3690,4321,4643,5050,5190,5222-5223,5228,5900,6660-6669,6679,6697,8000,8008,8074,8080,8087-8088,8332-8333,8443,8888,9418,9999-10000,11371,19294,19638

r MukiMukiAmaguri ADwuo9jHaHhVHIjp8/rSBaoXkj8 qZ48RT3ftleevrpO/kNy1qeBAS0 2013-05-16 18:16:19 119.25.52.227 9001 9030

s Fast HSDir Running Stable Unnamed V2Dir Valid

v Tor 0.2.2.39

w Bandwidth=38

p reject 1-65535

———————————————————————————-———————————————————————————-

r= Version of Tor- -OS -timestamp -IP address

s= Flags of the Onion-relay

w= bandwidth that the relays has

p= Exit relay information

The 10 servers on top of the documents are the Tor- Authority the servers that have all the real power in Tor controlled by – SiNA Rabbani (inf0) <sina redteam io> – Sebastian Hahn <tor@sebastianhahn.net> – Alex de Joode <adejoode@sabotage.org> – arma mit edu – Andreas Lehner <anonymizer@ccc.de> – Linus Nordberg <linus@nordberg.se> –  Mike Perry <mikeperryTAfsckedTODorg> – Jacob Appelbaum – Peter Palfrader <jacob@appelbaum.net> –

These are the real master of the Tor network nah… just joking it’s in the code– gAtO oUt

 

There is a small set (say, around 5-10) of semi-trusted directory authorities.  A default list of authorities is shipped with the Tor software.  Users can change this list, but are encouraged not to do so, in order to avoid partitioning attacks.

Every authority has a very-secret, long-term “Authority Identity Key”. This is stored encrypted and/or offline, and is used to sign “key certificate” documents.  Every key certificate contains a medium-term (3-12 months) “authority signing key”, that is used by the authority to sign other directory information.  (Note that the authority identity key is distinct from the router identity key that the authority uses in its role as an ordinary router.)

Routers periodically upload signed “routers descriptors” to the directory authorities describing their keys, capabilities, and other information.  Routers may also upload signed “extra info documents” containing information that is not required for the Tor protocol. Directory authorities serve router descriptors indexed by router identity, or by hash of the descriptor.

Routers may act as directory caches to reduce load on the directory authorities.  They announce this in their descriptors.

Periodically, each directory authority generates a view of the current descriptors and status for known routers.  They send a signed summary of this view (a “status vote”) to the other authorities.  The authorities compute the result of this vote, and sign a “consensus status” document containing the result of the vote.

Directory caches download, cache, and re-serve consensus documents.

Clients, directory caches, and directory authorities all use consensus

documents to find out when their list of routers is out-of-date.

(Directory authorities also use vote statuses.) If it is, they download

any missing router descriptors.  Clients download missing descriptors

from caches; caches and authorities download from authorities.

Descriptors are downloaded by the hash of the descriptor, not by the

relay’s identity key: this prevents directory servers from attacking

clients by giving them descriptors nobody else uses.

 

All directory information is uploaded and downloaded with HTTP.

[Authorities also generate and caches also cache documents produced and

used by earlier versions of this protocol; see dir-spec-v1.txt and

dir-spec-v2.txt for notes on those versions.]

Stopping Pedophile websites in Tor

gAtO-nOtEs– Stopping Pedophile websites in Tor 4 LE

Dark web drugs site Silk Road knocked offline by hacker – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22381046

From the IEEE report about “Trawling for Hidden Service” they explain as any network person knows that it take little more overhead to make a Tor connection than a regular Internet connection. (SSL-connections) That Tor-Relay will have to work harder and as more and more connections are made, Just like a DdoS attack but with a simple crawler we can bring down any Tor-Website from communicating with any new clients. The Tor-network has no load balance.

So a simple crawler looking for URL’s doing it’s work to gather information for a Tor search engine- Like I have – could accidentally play havoc on a Tor-websites -entry-relay —even silk road // no way pedro // so if we use enough of these crawlers we can stop people from getting to the website and they will have no clients.

Example for Law Enforcement:

Natural Spanking Website is Tor website- They have over 13,000 URL on their website – so that’s 13,000 pages of pedophile crap.  If we launch 8 crawlers from different places to crawl this site’s 13,000 pages again and again and again – all at the same time coming from different directions. Tor has no load balance so the websites Guard-relays cannot keep all these connections up. The (-combine crawlers coming all at the same time-from all over the world ) will prevent new clients accessing the site. The site will be un-reachable. You know what Amazon ec2 VPS server would be a great choice for this test.

If we do this for about 2-3 weeks – the word will go out that the site is down – The site will have to deploy and advertise new URL’S. if we also plan a campaign of propaganda news-feeds about that website and spread it on Twitter and get all the groups that hate pedophiles (anonymous and other groups). We can bring down any pedophile site this way.

But that’s a lot of work for any Law enforcement agency, but maybe not.01_29_tdp_xx

IEEE 2013 -Trawling for Tor- Hidden Service – http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2013/papers/4977a080.pdf

From this paper we find new ways to go after the websites and find the IP and geo-location, we can take over the entry-guard-relays and get statistics and usage and maybe clients of the website.

  •  We have a way to get Tor-Websites stats- we have a method to measure the popularity of any hidden service without the consent of the hidden service operator.
  • We will work on this way of stopping a Tor-website form operating -We show how connectivity to selected hidden services can be denied by impersonating all of their responsible hidden services directories.
  • We will demonstrate a technique that allows one to harvest hidden service descriptors (and thus get a global picture of all hidden services in Tor) in approximately 2 days using only a modest amount of resources.
  • We show how to reveal the guard nodes of a Tor hidden service.
  • Harvest all known Tor-hiddens service-websites.
  • We propose a large-scale opportunistic deanonymization attack, capable of revealing IP addresses of a significant fraction of Tor’s hidden services over a one year period of time.

Of course going after a website like this is only allowed by Law Enforcement – gAtO oUt

Tor Tells It’s Secrets

gAtO pLaYiNg with words in Tor We just simply counted the number of times a word appeared in our search engine by pages- this is something every search engine does but what it gave us was a picture of what Tor really is. It’s not all crime and ugly but information is number one in Tor. Exactly what it’s supposed to be. Tor was created to share information from the table below we see lot’s of stuff inside Tor.output

Tor word data points: We put this report together to see what our word count occurrence was, in our crawled data so far. The chart below gives an interesting picture of the Tor data points that it generates.

We are finding that these are the best categories to put our websites into. The words by site occurrence speaks volumes to understand trends in Tor.  For example it shows i2p network in Tor 2 notices above drugs in Tor. Because i2p is fast being intwined with Tor to get better anonymity.

  • These are real data point based on 3/27/2013-4/3/2013 – this is a live report from our crawls.
  • As we crawl and add more data our picture will change as to the landscape of Tor. 
  • Bitcoins is the fourth most popular word – currency in the Dark Web is number 1  

Word Num. Occurrences
blog 1014
wiki 985
anonymous 966
bitcoin 837
sex 530
gun 492
market 458
I2P 400
software 372
drugs 365
child 353
pedo 321
hacking 314
weapon 221
politic 209
books 157
exploit 118
anarchism 105
porno 88
baby 87
CP 83
fraud 76
piracy 69

 

  • Bitcoins are above SEX tell us volumes in that bit coins are the normal exchange currency in Tor.
  • Fraud and piracy are the lowest were we would except it to be much higher, People trust more in Tor.

This map does tell us that crime is everywhere in Tor at a more alarming rate than we though.

We are doing the same in the e-mail we found in Tor. In the email table is a place where we can get a better picture of emails in the Tor network. Not all of them go to tormail.org as we thought. As mentioned more i2p and connections with other anonymous networks seems to be a trend, as the growth rate of Tor users increase so is the technical base and more sophisticated users will come on board.

Hope this gives you a better picture of Tor. -gAtO oUt

Tor is NOT the ONLY Anonymous Network

gAtO fOuNd – this very interesting and wanted to share –

Tor does some things good, but other anonymous networks do other things better. Only when used together do they work best. And of course you want to already know how to use them should something happen to Tor and you are forced to move to another network.fin_07

Try them! You may even find something interesting you cannot find on Tor!

Anonymous networks

These are well known and widely deployed anonymous networks that offer strong anonymity and high security. They are all open source, in active development, have been online for many years and resisted attack attempts. They run on multiple operating systems and are safe to use with default settings. All are well regarded.

  • Tor – Fast anonymous internet access, hidden websites, most well known.
  • I2P – Hidden websites, anonymous bittorrent, mail, out-proxy to internet, other services.
  • Freenet – Static website hosting, distributed file storage for large files, decentralized forums.

Less well known

Also anonymous networks, but less used and possibly more limited in functionality.

  • GnuNet – Anonymous distributed file storage.
  • OneSwarm – Bittorrent, has a non-anonymous mode, requires friends for anonymity.
  • RetroShare – File-sharing, chat, forums, mail. Requires friends, and not anonymous to those friends, only the rest of the network.
  • Omemo – Distributed social storage platform. Uncertain to what extent it is anonymous.

Non-free networks

These are anonymous networks, but are not open source. Therefore their security and anonymity properties is hard to impossible to verify, and though the applications are legit, they may have serious weaknesses. Do not rely on them for strong anonymity.

  • Osiris – Serverless portal system, does not claim to provide any real anonymity.

In development

  • Phantom – Hidden Services, native IPv6 transport.
  • GlobaLeaks – Open Source Whistleblowing Framework.
  • FreedomBox – Project to create personal servers for distributed social networking, email and audio/video communications.
  • Telex – A new way to circumvent Internet censorship.
  • Project Byzantium – Bootable live distribution of Linux to set up wireless mesh nodes with commonly available hardware.
  • Hyperboria A distributed meshnet built on cjdns.

Routing Platforms

These are internets overlaid on the internet. They provide security via encryption, but only provides weak to none anonymity on their own. Only standard tools such as OpenVPN and Quagga are required to connect. Responsibility for a sufficiently anonymous setup is placed on the user and their advertised routes. More suited for private groups as things out in the open can be firewalled by other participants. Can be layered above or below other anonymity nets for more security and fun.

  • Anonet – AnoNet2, a more open replacement for AnoNet1.
  • dn42 – Another highly technical routing community.
  • CJDNS, an IPV6 overlay network that provides end to end encryption. It is not anonymous by itself.

Alternative Internet

  • Netsukuku – A project that aims to build a global P2P online network completely independent from the Internet by using Wi-Fi. The software is still in active development, although the site is no longer updated. A new site is in progress of being built.
  • Many other wireless communities building mesh networks as an alternative to the Internet, e.g. Freifunk, http://guifi.net and many more around the globe. see also

Alternative domain name systems

  • Namecoin – Cryptocurrency with the added ability to support a decentralised domain name system currently as a .bit.
  • OpenNIC – A user controlled Network Information Center offering a democratic, non-national, alternative to the traditional Top-Level Domain registries.
  • Dot-P2P – Another decentralized DNS service without centralized registry operators (at July 18, 2012 page is not accessible and has not known anything about the status of project from February 2011).

See Also

Finding the Bad Guy’s in Tor -triangulated irregular network

gAtO ThInKiNg – a car GPS works very simple, It takes the delay time from one geo-positioned satellite and compares is to another geo-positional satellite and estimates the position of the GPS in my CAR – I think they call it satellite triangulation or something cool, it’s been done with radios to guide pilots navigate ever since they developed radios. We do it with satellite and we can use networks too.

triangulated irregular network  -So now apply this to the Tor bad guy’s websites- a hidden service!math_clouadTag

With a simple command you can get the time it takes to crawl a website, so you have one server in the U.S one is South America, one in Europe and one in Asia and we run the same command getting the delays from each location. I bet with a little math and some basic network tools we could figure out the geo-location of any given website in Tor. One of my good mentors told me that in my crawls I was capturing timing information, we all see timing information with a simple ping command in the clear web but in Tor – UDP is unsupported so it does not work -//- we must take into account the Tor network thru-put and utilization bit that’s easy to get from a number of Tor tools.

Reverse triangulation of a network server should be easy to find with a little math, just take a good sample and the longer you wait the more data you collect and the better the chance you can find a geo-location of a website. We do this in the clear web all the time we can see bad areas of the world that are bad spammers, and other like mail from Africa Prince Scams offering you millions if you send them some money to cover the transfer, or Russian and Chinese phishing attacks. So we know geo-location and some IP are more prime to bad actors and we can draw a profile, a geo-location of a place and/or  country or an ISP so not having the IP of a Tor server may not be neededto find them we could use network triangulation. “triangulated irregular network  ” So the same thing can be done with networks and timing delays of data back and forth from a // client <–> Tor OR <–>server.

I got a crazy Idea that may or may-not work, but it sounds good—//  so— Now if I can only find a government grant and a good math major to help out and we have a big business model to find the bad guy’s geo-location even in Tor – gAtO oUt…